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https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Security-Cares-Focuses-on-School-Safety.aspxSecurity Cares Focuses on School SafetyGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652018-09-24T04:00:00ZPeggy O'Connor<p>​Held annually as a community give back to the GSX host community, Security Cares provides free security education to small and medium size businesses, as well as community and cultural institutions.</p><p>While this program has traditionally focused on broad security topics, this year's education takes a decidedly focused and fresh approach, with the ASIS School Safety and Security Council taking a lead role in all aspects of the program.</p><p>"Recent tragedies have brought the issue of school security to the forefront," says Jason Destein, vice chair of the ASIS School Safety and Security Council. "Communities across the United States are struggling with this issue and want to see action. The industry, law enforcement, school administrators, and community-at-large all have a role to play in creating safe learning environments."</p><p>A multi-day program, Security Cares kicked off this past Friday at the Miley Achievement Center where council member Rick Shaw addressed faculty, administrators, and invited guests at the ASIS International School Grant Award Ceremony.</p><p>Shaw discussed the importance of See Something, Say Something and how security is everyone's responsibility.</p><p>The program continues on Tuesday with the panel session "School Security: Beyond the Headlines," which will be livestreamed from the show floor.</p><p>"In the rush to find solutions, schools are faced with a dizzying array of products and services," Destein says. "However, there is no magical solution. We need to have informed discussions about best practices and community engagement in order to get this right. Getting involved in Security Cares and developing a program that helps foster these important conversations and dissemination of much-needed information was a natural fit for our council."</p><p>Council members Destein; Chuck McCormick, PSP; Jenni Hesterman, Ph.D.; and Shaw will address active shooter and the conditions that can lead to these acts of violence.</p><p>The panelists will also cover soft target hardening, technology and procurement assessments, and data and analytics as prevention tools.</p><p>Panelists will look to answer the tough questions and provide clear and concise recommendations for school security stakeholders to take back and discuss within their districts to implement positive changes.</p><p> This panel discussion will further the conversation that started over the summer with the "Back to School, Back to Safety" webinar series presented by the council. Wednesday's onsite program, "School Violence-Prevention and Preparedness," produced in partnership with the School Safety and Security Council, International Association of Chiefs of Police, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office of Infrastructure Protection, will kick off with a panel conversation featuring government, law enforcement, mental health, and industry stakeholders.</p><p>Topics to be discussed include pre-violence indicators, implementing See Something, Say Something policies, issues surrounding how at-risk individuals or reported behaviors are escalated, identifying best practices, and emphasizing the need for schools to have a collaborative approach to assess threats.</p><p>In addition, attendees will be provided with a list of resources to connect with at-risk individuals and tools to engage the entire community in school security.</p><p>Following the panel, attendees can participate in a tabletop exercise that will walk participants through an after-hours school violence incident. In this small group, train-the-trainer scenario, participants will be assigned specific roles (e.g. spokesperson, scribe, stakeholder) and teams.</p><p>Once the rules are explained and the emergency scenario is introduced, there will be facilitated and timed discussions with Q&A time among teams. Each team will then share specific responses as the scenario unfolds. Lessons learned from school incidents and other resources will be shared.</p><p>Through Security Cares, ASIS provides easily implementable prevention and preparedness strategies and best practices, as well as access to a global pool of the top leaders in the security management profession.</p><p>Launched in 2016, this initiative ensures that the host community receives a lasting benefit from the collective wisdom and product knowledge of the more than 20,000 practitioners gathered for GSX.</p>

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https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Security-Cares-Focuses-on-School-Safety.aspx2018-09-24T04:00:00ZSecurity Cares Focuses on School Safety
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Harassment-in-the-Academies.aspx2018-09-01T04:00:00ZHarassment in the Academies
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Checking-in-for-Safety.aspx2018-08-01T04:00:00ZChecking in for Safety
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review-The-Coming-Storm.aspx2018-08-01T04:00:00ZVideo Review: The Coming Storm
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Scanning-the-Schoolyard.aspx2018-06-01T04:00:00ZScanning the Schoolyard
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Safety-Strategy-on-Campus.aspx2018-06-01T04:00:00ZA Safety Strategy on Campus
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Shooting-at-Maryland-High-School-Leaves-One-Dead;-SRO-Ends-Threat.aspx2018-03-20T04:00:00ZShooting at Maryland High School Leaves One Dead; SRO Ends Threat
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Starting-from-the-End---Creating-a-Master-Security-Plan.aspx2018-03-19T04:00:00ZStarting from the End: Creating a Master Security Plan
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Florida-Governor-Unveils-Major-School-Security-Plan-In-Wake-Of-Shooting.aspx2018-02-23T05:00:00ZFlorida Governor Unveils Major School Security Plan In Wake Of Shooting
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Student’s-Impressive-Behavior-During-Tragic-Shooting-Shows-Importance-of-Training,-Expert-Says.aspx2018-02-15T05:00:00ZExpert: Students' Impressive Behavior in Tragic Shooting Shows Importance of Training
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Multiple-Fatalities-Reported-at-South-Florida-High-School-Shooting.aspx2018-02-14T05:00:00ZMultiple Fatalities Reported at South Florida High School Shooting
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/ENCUENTRA-EL-INCENDIO.aspx2018-02-07T05:00:00ZEncuentra el Incendio
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Put-Training-to-the-Test.aspx2018-01-01T05:00:00ZPut Training to the Test
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Find-the-Fire.aspx2018-01-01T05:00:00ZFind the Fire
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/School-Lockdown-Procedure-Prevented-Tragedy-in-Rancho-Tehama.aspx2017-11-16T05:00:00ZSchool Lockdown Procedure Prevented Tragedy in Rancho Tehama
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Building-a-Professional-Guard-Force.aspx2017-10-10T04:00:00ZBuilding a Professional Guard Force
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/An-Education-Connection.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZAn Education Connection
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Responding-to-San-Bernardino.aspx2017-05-01T04:00:00ZResponding to San Bernardino
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-February-2017.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZIndustry News February 2017
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Role-of-School-Resource-Officers.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZThe Role of School Resource Officers

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https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/School-Security-Trends.aspxSchool Security Trends<p>School security often involves response tools, from mass notification to surveillance to reporting. However, experts note that trends are moving away from technology as a single solution to prevention-based programs centered around information sharing, all-hazards training, and public-private partnerships.</p><p>Preventing a tragedy often starts with getting critical information into the right hands. </p><p>Take the case of two teens in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, who were arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit murder in October 2015. The two had plans to phone in a bomb threat to their school, then shoot people as they evacuated, CNN reported. A school resource officer discovered that one of the boys had threatened violence on the Internet, and the resulting investigation uncovered the plot. </p><p>In December 2015, an anonymous tip was sent to a Denver school district’s “Text-a-Tip” threat reporting hotline. Based on that information, two 16-year-old girls were found with plans to commit a mass killing at Mountain Vista High School. They were arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit first-degree murder, reported Reuters. </p><p>These stories, and many like them, have a common thread throughout: critical information was reported and acted upon in a timely manner, stopping any plans to commit harm. While some security experts do not like to classify tragedies as preventable, they say there are key threat indicators that pointed to the mass shootings and other attacks before they occurred. If communities, schools, and law enforcement work together to identify and connect these dots, future threats could be stopped. </p><p><em>Security Management </em>speaks to experts about their experience conducting threat assessments in schools and communities. ​</p><h4>Connecting the Dots</h4><p>After the December 2012 Sandy Hook shooting that killed 20 elementary-age children and six educators, Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy created a 16-member panel to review policies pertaining to school safety, gun-violence prevention, and mental health. The panel recommended in a 277-page report that all schools create safety committees that include police, first responders, administrators, and custodians. The report also urged each school to take an “all-hazards” approach to safety and security training for faculty, staff, and students. </p><p>Furthermore, the panel recommended that schools form threat assessment teams that “gather information from multiple sources in response to indications that a student, colleague, or other person’s behavior has raised alarms.” The report cites the U.S. Secret Service’s behavioral threat assessment model, which has been adopted for educational institutions, the workplace, and military settings. </p><p>“Once a team has identified someone who appears to be on a pathway to violence, the team ideally becomes a resource connecting the troubled child, adolescent, or adult to the help they need to address their underlying problems,” states the report, which goes on to say that such multidisciplinary teams can conduct risk assessments when questionable behaviors arise. “These would not only identify students at risk for committing violence, but also serve as a resource for children and families facing multiple stressors.” ​</p><h4>Partnerships</h4><p>As outlined in the Sandy Hook report, it is critical for organizations, schools, and communities to take an all-hazards approach to assessing and preparing for threats. If there is a dedicated platform or channel where they know they can report pertinent information, those dots can be connected in a meaningful way to prevent tragedy. </p><p>Two security experts share best practices with Security Management based on their experiences with threat assessments. These programs were bolstered by building partnerships with law enforcement and the community. </p><p>Working with stakeholders. Sometimes a threat assessment reveals an obvious problem that needs fixing, while other issues are uncovered only by working and communicating with stakeholders. Such was the case for school security professional Gary Sigrist, Jr., CEO and president at Safeguard Risk Solutions. </p><p>He tells Security Management that when he first started working at the South-Western City School district in Ohio, there were some obvious changes that needed to be made. “We had building principals who told their staff members they weren’t allowed to call 911 [in an emergency], that they have to call the office first,” he says. “We changed that.” </p><p>There was one building principal who told the cafeteria cooks that if there was a fire in the kitchen, not to pull the fire alarm until they had notified him first. “I brought the fire marshal in, and we had a conversation about that,” he notes. </p><p>Sigrist explains that working with law enforcement isn’t always a seamless process; sometimes schools and police in his district differed on their vision for a safe and secure environment. </p><p>“It’s not that the police were wrong, it’s just that some of their goals and objectives didn’t sync with the goals and objectives of the school,” according to Sigrist. But establishing regular meetings with law enforcement and other first responders was key to successful collaboration. “The police would say, ‘we think you should do this,’ and the school could say, ‘that’s not a bad idea, but let’s look at it from the point of view of the school,’” he notes. “Fire drills became better because we involved the fire department in the planning of our drills, where our command posts would be, and how we were going to check students in.” </p><p>He adds that first responder collaboration should go beyond just police and fire; schools rely on medical professionals when faced with health epidemics, for example. “When the Avian Flu and H1N1 sprang into effect, we worked with our county and state boards of health, and were able to develop a pandemic plan,” he says. “We had those subject matter experts.” </p><p>Over the course of his career at SouthWestern City Schools, Sigrist twice helped secure the Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) Grant, in 2008 and 2010, from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. These funds helped him establish many safety programs around the district. “Those are things people say, ‘wow, you must be a wonderful person to be able to get all of this done’–no, we had grant money,” he says. “It’s amazing what you can do with half a million dollars in grant money, and also the right support from the superintendents.” </p><p>No matter how prepared a school is for an emergency, those plans are truly put to the test when disaster strikes. Such was the case for South-Western City Schools when an explosion occurred at an elementary school. </p><p>“We had a building in a rural area, and the water table shifted, causing methane gas to build up in the basement. When it built up to a certain level with the right oxygen mix, there was an explosion,” Sigrist says. A custodian was injured, but everyone was able to evacuate the building safely as they had in many drills before. </p><p>The staff had been trained on how to function as a crisis team that was three members deep. Because the principal was not present at the time of the explosion, the building secretary assumed the role of incident commander, safely evacuating everyone from the building. “And it’s just evacuation training,” he says. “We never trained her on what to do when a building blew up.” </p><p>There were some key takeaways from the event that the district saw as areas of improvement. “Did we have lessons learned? Yes,” says Sigrist. “This happened almost right at dismissal, and we had school buses parked right in front of the building. Well–they didn’t move.” </p><p>These buses prevented fire trucks and other emergency vehicles from pulling right up to the scene. “And so one of our lessons learned is, if you have an incident, how are the buses going to pull out of the parking lot so the fire equipment can get in?” </p><p>Hometown security. Schools are a major focal point of the community, but they are not the only one. Societies are also made up of private businesses whose security is paramount to the overall environment of safety. Marianna Perry, CPP, a security consultant with Loss Prevention and Safety Management, LLC, explains that because about 85 percent of critical infrastructure in the United States is privately owned, “it makes sense that these businesses and communities partner with law enforcement to address problems.”  </p><p>Perry has more than 20 years of experience in conducting threat assessments for private businesses, as well as communities, including school districts. She recounts examples of how these reviews helped strengthen those localities, businesses, and law enforcement alike. </p><p>While Perry was the director of the National Crime Prevention Institute, there was a particular community with high crime rates, homelessness, and drug problems, as well as health-related issues. “There were abandoned properties, rental properties in disrepair, homes that had been foreclosed,” she says. “We were looking for a solution to help fix this community.” </p><p>Perry helped form a team of key stake­­holders and partners, including law en­forcement, a local university, security consultants, area churches, and the local health department. The public housing authority was also a major partner, as well as some local residents and business representatives. Initially, everyone came together for a week-long training program. The goal was to involve all partners in helping to develop strategies to improve the overall condition of the neighborhood, which in turn would help prevent crime. She says that much of the training was centered on crime prevention through environmental de­sign (CPTED), which predicates that the immediate environment can be designed in such a way that it deters criminal activity.  </p><p>She adds that the training wasn’t just focused only on preventing crime, but on several aspects of the community. “The goal was to improve the overall quality of life for everyone who lived or worked in that neighborhood,” says Perry. </p><p>The training also helped the partners learn to speak a common language. “We had all of these different people from different professional backgrounds and business cultures, and we needed them all on the same page,” she says. “They needed to be able to communicate with each other.” </p><p>A critical outcome of the training program, she says, was facilitating interaction among stakeholders, as well as developing and building trust. “It was a really successful partnership, and a lot of good was done for that community because everyone worked together to achieve common goals.” </p><p>Businesses also benefit from such assessments. Perry recently conducted a security assessment for one organization that was located in an area with one of the highest violent crime rates in the city. “Management was very concerned about the safety of their employees,” she notes. </p><p>During the assessment, Perry recommended that the company install additional cameras on the perimeter of their property for added surveillance and employee safety. The company could also share camera footage with law enforcement by tying their camera system into the citywide surveillance program. Perry worked with a local vendor to install IP cameras to cover a 10-block area. A control center operator would then monitor the cameras, and if he or she saw suspicious activity, either a security officer would be dispatched to respond, or 911 would be called. “I think people are now embracing the concept of public-private partnerships because they’re beginning to realize that they work,” Perry says.</p><p>Training. Preventing and detecting threats, while challenging, is possible when stakeholders share critical information. Having a centralized place for reporting such information is key, as well as training students, employees, and the community on how to use those platforms. </p><p>However, if the threat remains unde­tected or cannot be stopped, organiza­tions should conduct all-hazards training that covers a range of possible scenarios to ensure minimal damage and loss of life, says Kenneth Trump, president of National School Safety and Security Services. </p><p>“Active shooter is one concern, certainly, but it’s just that–one concern,” he says. “There’s a much greater likelihood that school employers are going to deal with a noncustodial parent issue multiple times during a school year than that they will ever deal­­—during their entire career working in the school—with an active shooter incident.” </p><p>Sigrist adds that having a laser-like focus on active shooter training can be a drawback for schools, because they lose sight of issues that have a greater likelihood of occurring. </p><p>“I asked one of my clients at a Head Start school how many times they have had a drunk parent show up to pick up a child, and they said, ‘it happens all the time,’” he says. “We still teach active shooter, but by teaching how to respond in an all-hazards approach, they will know how to take action.” </p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/School-of-Threats.aspxSchool of Threats<p>​In the fall of 2015, a university sophomore we will call Sophia spoke with her college’s Title IX coordinator, called Mr. Jones for the purposes of this article. Sophia told Jones that her former boyfriend—a sophomore at the same college—sexually assaulted her in 2014.</p><p>The two broke up over the summer, but Sophia thought her ex-boyfriend was stalking her now that they were both back on campus for the fall semester.</p><p>Jones told Sophia about her various options, including reporting the stalking to campus police or to local law enforcement, or filing a complaint with the college’s Student Conduct Office, which would then investigate and take action against her ex-boyfriend if necessary. </p><p>Jones also gave Sophia a list of support resources that she could access, including the college’s counseling center, women’s centers, and community-based resources for victims of domestic violence.</p><p>Sophia said she did not want to file a report with campus police or local law enforcement, but she did want to file a report with the Student Conduct Office.</p><p>Two days after filing her report, Sophia alerted Jones that she thought her ex-boyfriend was escalating his efforts to stalk her. She was afraid of what he might do to retaliate against her, and feared for her physical safety.</p><p>When Sophia mentioned that she feared for her own safety, Jones offered another option: he could alert the college’s threat assessment team to address the situation from a safety perspective. </p><p>The team could evaluate whether there was any threat posed to Sophia by her ex-boyfriend and could intervene—as necessary—to reduce the risk to Sophia while her report was investigated by the Student Conduct Office.  </p><p>As higher education and security professionals are well aware, the last few years have seen many changes in the law and guidance addressing sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking issues on college and university campuses. </p><p>Colleges and universities in the United States are now obligated to undertake certain actions when they become aware of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking at their institutions under new requirements from the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) through Title IX guidance and enforcement and amendments to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) made by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA).</p><p>Those requirements include taking swift action to investigate allegations of such incidents; notifying victims about the availability of protective and support resources; and notifying victims of their options to report the incident to law enforcement or to the institution’s conduct office or to opt not to report.</p><p>With the recent focus on the need for colleges and universities to aggressively pursue reports of sexual assault, interpersonal violence, and stalking, there has been little public discussion about the need to assess and maintain victim safety and campus safety while these investigations, called Title IX or Clery investigations, are undertaken. However, that is beginning to change.</p><p>Several prominent organizations and task forces have released reports on campus safety and violence prevention since the campus shootings at Virginia Tech in 2007 and at Northern Illinois University in 2008. All of these reports recommended that colleges and universities create threat assessment teams as a key measure to prevent violence before it occurs. </p><p>The threat assessment model is now advocated for use in higher education settings by entities at the federal and state levels, as well as various international and national associations. These include the U.S. Departments of Education, Justice, and Health and Human Services; the National Association of Attorneys General; the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators; and several state task forces.</p><p>In 2008, Virginia and Illinois both passed laws requiring colleges and universities to establish threat assessment teams. These laws apply to public higher education institutions in Virginia and to all higher education institutions in Illinois. In 2014, Connecticut also began requiring colleges and universities to be trained in campus threat assessment.</p><p>Additionally, in 2010 the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved a national standard for higher education risk analysis that is designed to identify, evaluate, and mitigate risks at higher education institutions and to help colleges and universities better allocate resources and prepare for emergencies.</p><p>“It is recommended that threat assessment teams be put into place on campus to help identify potential persons of concern and gather and analyze information regarding the potential threat posed by an individual(s),” the standard says.</p><p>Behavioral threat assessment is now recognized as a best practice for preventing campus violence and workplace violence at colleges and universities. Using threat assessment procedures can help enhance safety in Title IX and Clery cases in which there is a potential for ongoing interpersonal violence or stalking behavior, victims fear for their safety, or threats have been made before or after a victim files a police report or student conduct complaint.</p><p>In cases such as these, however, adhering to provisions of Title IX and the Clery Act is not enough; steps should be taken to identify and assess whether any threats are posed to those involved in these investigations and to manage the situation to reduce any such risk.​</p><h4>Integrating Threat Assessments</h4><p>In an environment in which victims, advocates, and public servants commonly express concerns about campus response to sexual violence, colleges and universities must also assess threats while investigating these incidents and publishing crime statistics—as required by federal law.</p><p>To best address these safety concerns, the institution’s threat assessment team or behavioral intervention team should be involved to run a parallel threat assessment investigation that is separate from, but coordinated with, the institution’s Clery investigation.</p><p>This level of coordination requires some effort, but is vital and can be done using five steps to maintain victim safety and campus security during investigations.</p><p>Create a threat assessment team. Institutions should have a threat assessment team—or a similar multidisciplinary team that is trained in behavioral threat assessment and threat management. </p><p>The best threat assessment teams include representatives from student affairs, academic affairs, the counseling center, human resources, campus police or security, and ad hoc members who might be needed for particular cases, such as veterans’ services for cases involving veterans or international programs members for cases involving international students.</p><p>Once the team is assembled, it should be trained in behavioral threat assessment, have the authority to engage in threat assessment on behalf of the institution, have procedures to guide activities of the team, and have access to case management and support resources—on campus and in the community—to intervene where needed.</p><p>Having training in best practice procedures is critical to ensuring that the team is equipped to objectively assess any risk or threat posed, and to take appropriate steps to intervene to reduce risk and manage the situation going forward.</p><p>Many institutions have established threat assessment teams, but only a subset of them have ever been trained in threat assessment procedures. One institution, whose threat assessment team lacked qualified training, did not know how to handle a stalking case that was escalating and decided to call in outside expertise to reduce the prospect that the situation could turn violent. </p><p>If a team has not received training in threat assessment procedures, the group should make sure to check the qualifications of potential training vendors before hiring them.</p><p>Understand Clery requirements. All personnel involved in threat assessment and safety should know that the DOE has issued guidance on requirements that institutions face under Title IX and preamble comments on regulations issued to implement the VAWA revisions to the Clery Act.</p><p>Under these laws, colleges and universities must respond swiftly to reports of sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking—not just those involving a threat assessment investigation. </p><p>This response must include providing information on confidential sources for victims to talk to and explaining reporting options to victims. The response must also include information on disciplinary and law enforcement reporting options should victims decide to report an incident to law enforcement or to the student conduct office.</p><p>In addition to responding to reports of sexual violence, colleges and universities must also actively work to prevent such crimes, including providing institutionwide training for students and employees.</p><p>Some colleges and universities are implementing mandated online training courses for students, as well as for faculty and staff, to raise awareness about sexual violence and the importance of bystander intervention. </p><p>But prevention efforts can also involve outreach from an institution’s threat assessment team to encourage people to report potentially dangerous situations and behaviors to the team when they become aware of them, so quick action can be taken to mitigate and reduce risk. </p><p>To address these wide-ranging duties and the increasing number of reports, institutions should have dedicated investigators to handle their Clery-related cases and responsibilities. In many cases, institutions will need to hire or retain these individuals.</p><p><strong>Alert the team.</strong> Once an institution has a threat assessment team, those taking reports from victims must learn when to alert the team. </p><p>Although reports of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are often referred to a Title IX coordinator or investigator, there may be ongoing safety concerns that should be addressed simultaneously and more broadly by a threat assessment team. If a report is made to an employee not designated as a “confidential employee,” that person can freely alert the threat assessment team. </p><p>Confidential employees include employees who are licensed medical, clinical, or mental-health professionals when acting in their professional role to provide services to a patient who is a university student. This category also includes university employees providing administrative, operational, and related support for healthcare providers performing these services.</p><p>Confidential employees are generally prohibited from reporting information to a college or university’s Title IX coordinator without permission from the individual who disclosed the information to them.</p><p>A confidential employee who receives a report should provide information about the threat assessment team to the victim or reporter, as well as provide options for reporting the incident and for safety planning. </p><p>If a risk is deemed sufficiently imminent to permit disclosure of privileged communications, the confidential employee could make other disclosures as necessary to promote safety. When victims better understand what a threat assessment team can do to enhance safety, they may be willing to have their situation reported to the team.</p><p><strong>Get legal advice.</strong> Teams should seek advice from the institution’s legal counsel on how to address situations in which a victim requests confidentiality or anonymity. </p><p>In 2014, the DOE’s Office of Civil Rights (OCR) published guidance on Title IX issues that clarified a 2011 document on the limits of confidentiality in certain situations.</p><p>For instance, the OCR recognized that institutions may not be able to respect requests for confidentiality where circumstances suggest there is an increased risk of further violence. The OCR included examples of these circumstances, such as multiple complaints about that person, a history of violence and arrests, multiple perpetrators, patterns of perpetration, use of weapons, and threats to commit further violence.</p><p>Train and practice, together. Personnel involved in Clery cases and those involved in threat assessment matters can learn a great deal about each other’s methods, resources, and obligations when they spend time together—preferably not just on active cases.</p><p>Finding opportunities to train together in tabletop exercises, and to train each other on their respective jurisdictions and areas of expertise, will enhance coordination and cooperation when faced with a high-risk case.</p><p>One threat assessment team, which had received training on trauma-informed investigations from its institution’s Title IX coordinator, increased its awareness about the effects of trauma. As a result, the team changed its approach to interviews with complainants of stalking. </p><p>Since the training, the team now chooses—where possible—to give its questions to Title IX investigators to ask of a complainant to avoid subjecting the individual to yet another interview on the same matter. This process is designed to minimize stress and additional trauma. ​</p><h4>Outcomes </h4><p>In Sophia’s case, involving the college’s threat assessment team helped the institution get a more complete picture of her safety and any potential danger she faced as the investigation unfolded. </p><p>One of the first options the team suggested was that either the Student Conduct Office or the campus police department issue a “no-contact order.” A no-contact order prohibits contact—whether in person, by phone, email, text, social media, or through a third party—between individuals at an institution where the college or university feels it is necessary to impose such a boundary. </p><p>No-contact orders are often issued by student conduct officers when they are investigating potential violations of a student code of conduct. The orders do not require the same level of evidence required to obtain a court-issued restraining order or protective order—but they carry significant consequences if violated. </p><p>For instance, some institutions can take immediate disciplinary and protective action if an order is violated, such as immediate suspension or barring the individual from campus.</p><p>This is a tool administered solely by the college and did not require Sophia to file a police report, even if the campus police department issued the order.</p><p>Following best practice threat assessment procedures, the threat assessment team in Sophia’s case gathered information from multiple sources about her ex-boyfriend and his recent behaviors and communications. </p><p>The team was able to corroborate Sophia’s accounts of his stalking behavior and discovered a series of disturbing posts he made on social media that suggested he was experiencing increasing desperation, and may have been suicidal. </p><p>A member of the team conducted a conversation with the ex-boyfriend, confirming his growing level of desperation. The team then assessed that Sophia’s case required inter­vention to reduce risk.</p><p>First, the team’s representative from the campus police department asked campus police to immediately transport Sophia’s ex-boyfriend to the college’s counseling center for a safety assessment to determine if he was suicidal. </p><p>At the same time, the team’s representative from the counseling center notified personnel at the center about the transport and provided information to the mental health provider who was conducting the assessment, so the provider had appropriate background information to include in the assessment.</p><p>In addition, the team asked the college’s Residential Life Office if it could provide Sophia with emergency alternate housing so her ex-boyfriend would not know where she was living. Campus police also provided Sophia with safety planning and offered to escort her around campus, if she wanted that service. </p><p>Sophia’s ex-boyfriend followed the no-contact order and did not have any contact with Sophia throughout the student conduct process. The team remained involved in monitoring the case as it proceeded and in conducting a follow-up assessment after her ex-boyfriend was sanctioned by the college.</p><p>The team was actively involved in the case until it assessed that Sophia’s ex-boyfriend no longer posed a threat to her—which was several months after the conclusion of the investigation.</p><p>Finding ways to improve communication and coordinate efforts between Title IX/Clery personnel and threat assessment teams can help security protect students. A multidisciplinary approach to training, assessing threats, and responding to incident reports can help ensure a safer campus for all. </p><p>--<br></p><p><em>Marisa R. Randazzo, Ph.D., is a managing partner of SIGMA Threat Management Associates and former chief research psychologist for the U.S. Secret Service. Jeffrey J. Nolan, JD, is a partner at Dinse, Knapp & McAndrew, P.C. Dorian Van Horn is a senior consultant with SIGMA Threat Management Associates and former division chief of the Threat Management Unit for the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. ​ ​</em></p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/21st-century-security-and-cpted-designing-critical-infrastructure-protection-and-crime-prev-0.aspx21st Century Security and CPTED: Designing for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Crime Prevention, Second Edition.<div class="body"> <p> <em> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">CRC Press. Available from ASIS, item #2078; 954 pages; $120 (ASIS member), $132 (nonmember). Also available as e-book.</span> </span> </em> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">As good as the first edition of 21st Century Security and CPTED was, this second edition surpasses it. Atlas, known in security circles as a consummate professional, has done an outstanding job in creating this second edition, which has twice as much material as the original edition. It also includes voluminous references and hundreds of outstanding clarifying photos in both color and black-and-white. Using humor and candid insight he incorporates all the concepts of CPTED, including design, construction, security countermeasures, and risk management strategies, and merges them into a highly informative reference manual for security practitioners at every level.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">There is a logical flow to the book. It lays a solid foundation by discussing architecture and its intent, as well as environmental crime control theories and premises liability. There is something here for everyone as it also discusses terrorism and critical infrastructure from differing perspectives. Several chapters on problem solving provide guidance on conducting threat, risk, and vulnerability assessments.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Throughout, Atlas provides a roadmap for merging security and CPTED into management principles and practices in a wide variety of facility settings, including healthcare facilities, critical infrastructure, ATMs, office buildings, parking lots and structures, and parks and green spaces. The latter portion of the book is reserved for concepts including lighting, LEED and GREEN certification, workplace violence, signage, data capture and analysis, and conducting CPTED surveys.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Atlas has created the definitive book on CPTED and security. Despite the magnitude and complexity of the science and art of security management, he has done an outstanding job of merging these and other disciplines and concepts together into a cogent display of information that the reader should be able to apply in a wide variety of locations and situations. If you are only going to buy one book this year, it is strongly suggested you purchase this one. </span> </span> </p> <hr /> <p> <span style="color:#800000;"> <strong> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Reviewer:</span> </span> </strong> </span> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;"> Glen Kitteringham, CPP, has worked in the security industry since 1990. He holds a master’s degree in security and crime risk management. He is president of Kitteringham Security Group Inc., which consults with companies around the globe. </span> </span> </p> </div>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465