Security by Industry

 

 

https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/May-2018-ASIS-News.aspxMay 2018 ASIS NewsGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652018-05-01T04:00:00ZPeggy O'Connor<h4>​Big Event Coming to the Big Apple</h4><p>More than 2,200 security and law enforcement professionals will convene in New York City for the ASIS International 28th New York City Security Conference and Expo May 16-17 at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.</p><p>The conference will open Wednesday at 8:00 a.m. with a keynote address from Scott Morrison, head of global crisis management and command centers for JPMorgan Chase & Co. He will share his thoughts on emerging trends from terror attacks to kidnapping, and from cybersecurity to intellectual theft.</p><p>Two days of peer-developed education will address some of today's most pressing security challenges, including a full day of learning focused on active assailant prevention and response. Conference sessions include:​</p><p><strong>Drone Technology</strong></p><p>Take a closer look at the current state of drone technology and explore industry trends from all angles.</p><p><strong>Get Your Seat at the Table</strong></p><p>Through the lens of enterprise security risk management (ESRM), security becomes an organization's roadmap for meaningful, effective risk management.</p><p><strong>Securing an Open Office</strong> </p><p>Facebook Chief Global Security Officer Nick Lovrien will explain how Facebook developed a collaborative open office environment while attempting to mitigate risk. </p><p><strong>Active Threat and Culture</strong></p><p>This session examines the cultural differences between an organization that values the "spend" vs. those that look at security as an expense that needs to be slashed.</p><p><strong>Vehicle Attacks</strong></p><p>No community is immune from vehicular terrorist attacks, which have recently caused 204 deaths and 861 injuries in the U.S. and abroad. How can they be deterred?</p><p>Besides paid conference registration, attendees can choose a free expo-only pass that includes access to the exhibit hall on both days, daily receptions and coffee breaks on the exhibit floor, and career coaching services.</p><p>The ASIS New York City Chapter will honor His Eminence Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York, as the NYC Chapter Person of the Year. Dolan, whose career in the Catholic Church spans more than 40 years, will be honored for his dedication to the people of New York. Always a popular event, the Person of the Year Luncheon will be held at noon on Thursday, May 17. Tickets to this event are included with conference registration. To learn more, go to asisonline.org/nyc2018.​</p><h4>Globalization Update</h4><p>In April, ASIS International members received an update about the work underway in support of the Society's globalization initiative and the impact of this work on 2018 Board elections. President Richard E. Chase, CPP, PCI, PSP, sent the following letter to members last month.</p><p>Fellow members,</p><p>I am pleased to provide an update on the progress made to fully globalize ASIS International. Our 2017-2021 strategic plan identified improving the ASIS Global Network as one of five key priorities. It's understood that the future success of ASIS is dependent on our ability to be relevant to members around the globe, across all markets, and at every step of the career ladder. This can only be done by employing innovative solutions that foster collaboration and easy sharing of information locally, regionally, and worldwide.</p><p>In 2017,  the Globalization Task Force, composed of a diverse cross section of volunteer leaders, was established to evaluate common practices of other global nonprofit organization management models and identify changes we could make to our organizational structure. Led by 2018 Board Treasurer Godfried Hendriks, CPP, this important work, which included reviewing and redefining roles and responsibilities for our chapter and regions, council, and regional advisory council leaders with an aim to "flatten" our leadership structure, will allow the Society to be more deliberate and nimble in how we deliver our products and services. And most importantly, to create an inclusive volunteer leadership structure that truly reflects the diversity of our membership.</p><p>Through this undertaking, it became clear that we needed to not only rethink our volunteer structure, but also how we select our governing leadership positions—specifically, the ASIS International Board of Directors. </p><p>In March, a Presidential Governance Task Force was established to reevaluate the ASIS board nominations process and overall board governance with an eye towards global diversity, inclusion, and selection criteria, which targets a proportionate representation of the association's members and the overall depth of experience of directors' backgrounds. </p><p>Co-chaired by President-Elect Christina Duffey, CPP, and 2018 Board Secretary John Petruzzi, CPP, this task force is working under an expedited timeline, with a goal of delivering recommendations—including director job descriptions and creation of a governance committee—by January 2019. As such, the Board passed a motion to forgo Board elections in 2018. This will provide an opportunity for the task force to complete its work and to ensure the Board of Directors reflects the global membership it represents in 2019 and beyond. </p><p>Later this summer, we will be providing more details on the Globalization Task Force recommendations. This is an exciting time for the Society as we continue to implement our member-driven strategic objectives. As always, we encourage you to email asisfuture@asisonline.org to share your feedback.</p><p> </p><h4>ASIS Brings Top Business Education to Spain</h4><p><em>Effective Management for Security Professionals 2-5 July, 2018 Madrid, Spain</em></p><p> Looking to take the next step in developing your business acumen? Security executives are invited to attend a four-day executive education program in Madrid, Spain. The theme is Establishing the Security Role as an Enabler for Business Success.</p><p>Presented by IE Business School in collaboration with ASIS International, this course provides an opportunity for mid-career to senior security managers to take a deep dive into the central areas of management, enhancing their effectiveness in the corporate environment and enabling them to align their expertise with the organization's security requirements. It focuses on:</p><p>•             Leading in Uncertainty</p><p>•             Creating a Strategic Mindset</p><p>•             Applying Financial Information</p><p>•             Negotiation</p><p> Prior to the program, registrants will be granted access to the IE Online Campus to prepare classwork and readings and facilitate their campus learning experience. Once on site, the class will participate in interactive lectures, debates, group work, case studies, and role play.</p><p>"Today, companies and organizations are looking for professionals who are highly trained not only in enterprise security risk management, but also in business," says program director Juan Muñoz, CPP, ASIS Spain Chapter chair. "For years now, the role of chief security officer has been progressively evolving. It is precisely in this context where the Effective Management for Security Professionals course reaches its main added value as a business executive education tool."</p><p>ASIS members save significantly on their registration fees. Additionally, registrants will receive 40 CPEs for their participation. New this year: Members of the CSO Center receive an additional 5 percent discount off the member fee. See details at https://www.asisonline.org/ie.  ​</p><h4>International Buyer Program Delivers Global to GSX</h4><p>Security professionals outside North America who are looking to participate in the most anticipated security event of the year can start planning their travel now.</p><p>Global Security Exchange (GSX), formerly the ASIS International Annual Seminar and Exhibits, is proud to once again participate in the U.S. Department of Commerce's International Buyer Program (IBP). </p><p>The IBP is a government–industry partnership that brings global buyers to the United States for business-to-business opportunities with U.S. firms at major industry trade shows. GSX's participation in this event demonstrates the importance of the event to the security industry worldwide. </p><p>According to the department's website, "every year, the IBP results in approximately a billion dollars in new business for U.S. companies, and increased international attendance for participating U.S. trade show organizers."</p><p>International attendees are encouraged to join an IBP delegation and take advantage of special registration rates and benefits—available only to participants. To register with an official IBP delegation, contact the commercial service specialist at your local U.S. Embassy or Consulate to discuss attending GSX 2018 and receive a special registration code. To learn more about the International Buyer Program, visit <a href="http://www.gsx.org/IBP">www.gsx.org/IBP</a>.​</p><h4>Executive Protection Council Spotlight</h4><p>Launched in 2015, the Executive Protection Council is one of the newest ASIS councils. In the years since its creation, the council has more than doubled in size, with 40 members representing organizations as diverse as Northrop Grumman, Facebook, McDonald's, Time Warner Cable, and PayPal, to name a few. Each member is driven to share expertise and affirm executive protection's place in the security profession. </p><p>Executive protection (EP) is a specialized field of security that Council Chair Bob Oatman, CPP, says has grown dramatically in recent years: "The profession itself has existed in government since the days of Lincoln—Secret Service, security details for mayors and governors, and the like. The private sector is where big change is taking place. Hollywood A-listers, corporate executives, and their families—they're recognizing the need for what we do. We wouldn't have a standing council if companies weren't engaged in having EP as part of their security program. We're business enablers. We protect the brand. We help people in the C-suite get where they need to go."</p><p>Oatman has been conducting a two-day EP classroom training with ASIS since 1998. When the Society launched a certificate for the program in 2013, the council's founding members saw it as a significant validation that EP has a place in the broader security community. They approached ASIS about forming a council, and now enjoy an increased reach to share EP best practices.</p><p>The council will sponsor an education session this September at Global Security Exchange (GSX), formerly the ASIS International Annual Seminar and Exhibits, where it has sponsored sessions each of the last three years. At this year's session, in a simulation titled "The Trilogy of Executive Protection—Making the Case," council members will present attendees with an EP problem. In groups, attendees will workshop and develop a pitch to sell their EP solution to mock executives.</p><p>In addition to its classroom program, the council has also produced a webinar, contributed an article to Security Management, and developed a proposal for the potential development of an ASIS standard or guideline around executive protection.</p><p>The council also engages in outreach to keep ASIS members up to date on its initiatives. Its biannual newsletter, which shares council updates and touches upon important EP themes, is available in both English and Spanish. The latest issue, available within ASIS Connects, includes articles on the unique rewards and challenges of working in EP and the council's proposed standard or guideline. The council has also appointed liaisons to the Young Professionals, Women in Security, Transitions Ad Hoc Council, and Critical Infrastructure Working Group. </p><p>To learn more about executive protection or to engage with council members or find their latest newsletter, visit ASIS Connects and search for Executive Protection.​</p><h4>Life Members</h4><p>Raymond L. Dean, Sultan H. Alzahrani, and Herbert M. Kaltz, CPP, have been granted lifetime membership to ASIS. </p><p>Dean has been a member of the New York City Chapter since 1981, and he served as the chapter's chair, vice chair, and secretary. In 2011, Dean was awarded the Presidential Award of Merit by ASIS. He is a two-time recipient of the Eugene Casey Award for dedicated service to the NYC Chapter, plus he won the chapter's Joseph Spillane Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. </p><p>Alzahrani joined ASIS more than 30 years ago and has been an active member of the Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Chapter, serving as its chair multiple times. He has also been a regional vice president and assistant regional vice president for many years. </p><p>Kaltz has been a dedicated member of ASIS for more than 32 years. He provided service to the ASIS Detroit Chapter as a chapter chair, vice chair, secretary, and communications chair. ​</p><p> </p><h4>ESRM in Action</h4><p>In 2016, ASIS made enterprise security risk management (ESRM) an organizational priority and has begun infusing this management philosophy into all the Society's programs and services. In the months ahead, we will provide updates, as well as showcase how members are implementing ESRM in their organizations.</p><p><em>By Jon Harris, CPP, PSP</em></p><p>Our "aha" moment came during the ESRM tabletop exercise at the ASIS conference in Dallas last year. My colleague and I realized we were omitting critical components from our risk evaluation process, and therefore missing an opportunity to add significant value to our company. We had a business continuity program, emergency response processes, workplace violence prevention program, and facility risk assessments—the miss was that they were not connected and were too focused on the security aspects of our organization.</p><p>By taking a step back and reframing our entire program within the structure of ESRM, we were able to focus our efforts towards the areas of greatest operational risk, using the existing programs we had in place and providing valuable intelligence to the business. Additionally, we broadened the purview of our assessment to the entire organization—from the supply chain, to operating facilities, and through our service organizations.</p><p>Here are our recommendations:</p><p><strong>Get started</strong>. Taking too much time to analyze and come up with the perfect approach will stall your efforts. The process is organic and will evolve over time; continuous improvement is a critical facet of the program and must be embraced. </p><p><strong>Invite everyone to the party.</strong> The greatest value will come with the broadest inclusion and participation. </p><p><strong>Make it simple. </strong>We distilled our mission down to four words: Keep the doors open. At the end of the day, that was our focus and being successful in all the components of our program would deliver that output. The simplicity of the message allowed for an easy delivery to all levels of the organization.</p><p>While the program is still in its infancy, we are excited about our progress to date and the long-term prospects. ESRM has been transformative for how we proactively approach our security program and visibly increase its value to the organization.</p><h4>Member Book Review</h4><p><em>Can I See Your Hands: A Guide to Situational Awareness, Personal Risk Management, Resilience and Security.</em> By Gav Schneider, CPP. Universal Publishers; universal-publishers.com; 226 pages; $27.95. </p><p>Dr. Gav Schneider is a South African martial artist who teaches security workshops. His new book <em>Can I See Your Hands </em>stands on the shoulders of well-known legends in the violence prevention and threat assessment arenas, including police response trainer Dave Grossman (who wrote the Foreword) and Hollywood security guru Gavin de Becker.</p><p>Schneider starts with the familiar concept that there are three groups in the world: sheep, wolves, and shepherds. This book is definitely for the latter. Creating awareness of violent situations and developing personal risk management skills are his overarching themes. He uses models and acronyms to remind readers to avoid denial and to create and train for survival strategies.</p><p>He goes back in time to reference Jeff Cooper's color codes: Conditions White, Yellow, Orange, and Red (and Black in actual war-time combat). He has created his own model, the "Three Point Check System" (3PC-S), which focuses on scanning the Place, the People in the area, and Planned incident actions and Contingency plans. </p><p>The author espouses the use of the Run. Hide. Fight. concept for active assailants as a doable contingency plan. But during a violent attack, you must be able to activate what he calls "Adrenal Response Management." This means controlling stress through repetitive physical and mental training for protection, awareness, and to manage the stress response that can paralyze people in life-threatening situations.</p><p>While most content is familiar, the final chapter, which gives new information on the consequences of having to use physical or deadly force against someone, is the most valuable part of the book. The mental fallout of using force is not often discussed, and it's a vital part of surviving the encounter.</p><p>The slim book is easy to understand, with a useful summary at the end of each chapter. The appendix offers information for protection at home, away from home, and in cyberspace. An index would have been helpful, and adding workplace protection concepts would have been useful. All in all, readers who want to ramp up their pre-attack awareness will learn how to do it. </p><p>Reviewer: ASIS member Dr. Steve Albrecht, CPP, is a Colorado Springs-based author, trainer, and threat management consultant.</p>

 

 

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But establishing regular meetings with law enforcement and other first responders was key to successful collaboration. “The police would say, ‘we think you should do this,’ and the school could say, ‘that’s not a bad idea, but let’s look at it from the point of view of the school,’” he notes. “Fire drills became better because we involved the fire department in the planning of our drills, where our command posts would be, and how we were going to check students in.” </p><p>He adds that first responder collaboration should go beyond just police and fire; schools rely on medical professionals when faced with health epidemics, for example. “When the Avian Flu and H1N1 sprang into effect, we worked with our county and state boards of health, and were able to develop a pandemic plan,” he says. “We had those subject matter experts.” </p><p>Over the course of his career at SouthWestern City Schools, Sigrist twice helped secure the Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) Grant, in 2008 and 2010, from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. These funds helped him establish many safety programs around the district. “Those are things people say, ‘wow, you must be a wonderful person to be able to get all of this done’–no, we had grant money,” he says. “It’s amazing what you can do with half a million dollars in grant money, and also the right support from the superintendents.” </p><p>No matter how prepared a school is for an emergency, those plans are truly put to the test when disaster strikes. Such was the case for South-Western City Schools when an explosion occurred at an elementary school. </p><p>“We had a building in a rural area, and the water table shifted, causing methane gas to build up in the basement. When it built up to a certain level with the right oxygen mix, there was an explosion,” Sigrist says. A custodian was injured, but everyone was able to evacuate the building safely as they had in many drills before. </p><p>The staff had been trained on how to function as a crisis team that was three members deep. Because the principal was not present at the time of the explosion, the building secretary assumed the role of incident commander, safely evacuating everyone from the building. “And it’s just evacuation training,” he says. “We never trained her on what to do when a building blew up.” </p><p>There were some key takeaways from the event that the district saw as areas of improvement. “Did we have lessons learned? Yes,” says Sigrist. “This happened almost right at dismissal, and we had school buses parked right in front of the building. Well–they didn’t move.” </p><p>These buses prevented fire trucks and other emergency vehicles from pulling right up to the scene. “And so one of our lessons learned is, if you have an incident, how are the buses going to pull out of the parking lot so the fire equipment can get in?” </p><p>Hometown security. Schools are a major focal point of the community, but they are not the only one. Societies are also made up of private businesses whose security is paramount to the overall environment of safety. Marianna Perry, CPP, a security consultant with Loss Prevention and Safety Management, LLC, explains that because about 85 percent of critical infrastructure in the United States is privately owned, “it makes sense that these businesses and communities partner with law enforcement to address problems.”  </p><p>Perry has more than 20 years of experience in conducting threat assessments for private businesses, as well as communities, including school districts. She recounts examples of how these reviews helped strengthen those localities, businesses, and law enforcement alike. </p><p>While Perry was the director of the National Crime Prevention Institute, there was a particular community with high crime rates, homelessness, and drug problems, as well as health-related issues. “There were abandoned properties, rental properties in disrepair, homes that had been foreclosed,” she says. “We were looking for a solution to help fix this community.” </p><p>Perry helped form a team of key stake­­holders and partners, including law en­forcement, a local university, security consultants, area churches, and the local health department. The public housing authority was also a major partner, as well as some local residents and business representatives. Initially, everyone came together for a week-long training program. The goal was to involve all partners in helping to develop strategies to improve the overall condition of the neighborhood, which in turn would help prevent crime. She says that much of the training was centered on crime prevention through environmental de­sign (CPTED), which predicates that the immediate environment can be designed in such a way that it deters criminal activity.  </p><p>She adds that the training wasn’t just focused only on preventing crime, but on several aspects of the community. “The goal was to improve the overall quality of life for everyone who lived or worked in that neighborhood,” says Perry. </p><p>The training also helped the partners learn to speak a common language. “We had all of these different people from different professional backgrounds and business cultures, and we needed them all on the same page,” she says. “They needed to be able to communicate with each other.” </p><p>A critical outcome of the training program, she says, was facilitating interaction among stakeholders, as well as developing and building trust. “It was a really successful partnership, and a lot of good was done for that community because everyone worked together to achieve common goals.” </p><p>Businesses also benefit from such assessments. Perry recently conducted a security assessment for one organization that was located in an area with one of the highest violent crime rates in the city. “Management was very concerned about the safety of their employees,” she notes. </p><p>During the assessment, Perry recommended that the company install additional cameras on the perimeter of their property for added surveillance and employee safety. The company could also share camera footage with law enforcement by tying their camera system into the citywide surveillance program. Perry worked with a local vendor to install IP cameras to cover a 10-block area. A control center operator would then monitor the cameras, and if he or she saw suspicious activity, either a security officer would be dispatched to respond, or 911 would be called. “I think people are now embracing the concept of public-private partnerships because they’re beginning to realize that they work,” Perry says.</p><p>Training. Preventing and detecting threats, while challenging, is possible when stakeholders share critical information. Having a centralized place for reporting such information is key, as well as training students, employees, and the community on how to use those platforms. </p><p>However, if the threat remains unde­tected or cannot be stopped, organiza­tions should conduct all-hazards training that covers a range of possible scenarios to ensure minimal damage and loss of life, says Kenneth Trump, president of National School Safety and Security Services. </p><p>“Active shooter is one concern, certainly, but it’s just that–one concern,” he says. “There’s a much greater likelihood that school employers are going to deal with a noncustodial parent issue multiple times during a school year than that they will ever deal­­—during their entire career working in the school—with an active shooter incident.” </p><p>Sigrist adds that having a laser-like focus on active shooter training can be a drawback for schools, because they lose sight of issues that have a greater likelihood of occurring. </p><p>“I asked one of my clients at a Head Start school how many times they have had a drunk parent show up to pick up a child, and they said, ‘it happens all the time,’” he says. “We still teach active shooter, but by teaching how to respond in an all-hazards approach, they will know how to take action.” </p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/Scholastic-Surveillance.aspxScholastic Surveillance<p>There’s a growing consensus on the issue of placing security cameras in schools—a recent study found that 72 percent of adults favor the practice. That percentage of support is up 7 percent from a year ago, when 65 percent were in favor of school cameras in a similar survey. </p><p>“This number has risen in recent years, with increased attention on preparedness in handling potential threats,” wrote Dean Drako, president and CEO of Eagle Eye Networks, which commissioned the study. The report compiled surveys from 1,500 respondents from all regions of the United States taken earlier this year. The survey defined schools as preschool/daycare, K-12, and college.  </p><p>Asked to cite why respondents saw security cameras as valuable, the most popular reason (cited by 64 percent of respondents) was to “identify criminals and facts after events.” This reason was followed by “real-time insights during emergencies,” at 59 percent, and “deterring crimes,” at 57 percent.   </p><p>In addition, 78 percent of respondents said they thought it was important for first responders to be able to access school video during an emergency. “This result signals the high value the community places on ensuring immediate situational awareness during a crisis on campus,” Drako wrote.  </p><p>In the report, the top five camera location priorities were at entrances and exits (76 percent), hallways (62 percent), and lunchrooms, playgrounds, and gyms (53 percent). Only a minority of respondents wanted cameras in classrooms (36 percent) and locker rooms and bathrooms (18 percent). </p><p>However, Kenneth Trump, president of National School Safety and Security Services, who has worked and consulted on school safety projects across the country, says he now sees a few complicating factors regarding the use of surveillance cameras in schools, based on the many assessments his consulting firm has done for schools from preschool through 12th grade. </p><p>“We often see that schools put cameras in based on a one-time shot in the arm funding—often due to state grants, or a one-time allocation in a capital improvement program,” Trump says. The launch of these new cameras is often featured in press conferences or public announcements. </p><p>But then, when the cameras need to be fixed or replaced three or four years down the road, the school district has no budget allocation at either the individual building or district level for repair or replacement. The cameras can then sit dormant for months, or even longer, while “parents, students, and staff are under the impression that cameras are functioning when they are not,” he explains.  </p><p>  Trump himself believes that cameras can be a useful tool in overall school security. “Cameras deter those who can be deterred,” he says.  And their footage can serve as evidence in some cases. “They serve a role, but there are limitations,” he adds.   </p><p>  Trump also says that, in his assessments, he has found an overall trend that some schools are putting disproportionately more emphasis on hardware and products, and less “on the people side” of school security. “School leaders are well-intended, but there is a lot of political pressure to do this,” he says. “And certainly there are a lot of opportunistic vendors.” </p><p>“Many school administrators will throw up some cameras to fortify their front entrance,” he continues. “But the reality is, it is what is behind those fortified walls that really makes up the heart of your school security program—which is your people.” </p><p>Of course, investing in “the people side” of school security takes time and money, he says. It often means professional development training not just for teachers and administrators, but for support staff: the bus drivers, who are the first and last ones to see students every day. Secretaries who might take a call from someone making a bomb threat. Custodians and food service staff, who may be the first ones to notice any strangers on campus. “They are on the front lines,” he says. “They should be included in tabletop exercises, along with the first responders.”  </p><p>However, training and development for all staff takes a funding investment, and some districts find it cheaper to buy more hardware instead. In addition, Trump says that he has been seeing another trend—hardware and product vendors in some states lobbying state legislators to put school security and emergency planning into the hands of homeland security officials, and out of hands of the school administrators, which could thwart training and development. </p><p>In the Eagle Eye survey, a majority of the respondents (56 percent) said they believe that visible security cameras would reduce bullying in schools. Again, however, Trump says that while cameras can be an effective component of an antibullying program, “the first and best line of defense is a well-trained and highly alert staff and student body.” Unlike a camera, staff can “see things that are invisible,” such as dynamics between students, which indicate potential or possible bullying. Technology can be a supplement, but not a substitute, for this. </p><p>Strong security programs continue to be sorely needed, as violent fatalities continue to be a problem in schools. Another recent report, which looked at the 2012-13 school year (the latest data available), found that nearly 3 percent of violent deaths among American school age youth took place at school or school-related environments. </p><p>The report, Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2015, is a joint effort from the National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, and the Bureau of Justice Statistics at the U.S. Department of Justice. It found that, in the period from July 1, 2012, through June 30, 2013, there were a total of 41 school-associated homicides in U.S. elementary and secondary schools, slightly less than 3 percent of the total number of school-age homicides in America.   </p><p>The 3 percent figure has stayed consistent since annual statistics were first compiled for the 1992-93 school year. Authors of the study indicated that the percentage, although low, was still unacceptable. “Our nation’s schools should be safe havens for teaching and learning, free of crime and violence,” the authors wrote. </p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://adminsm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Role-of-School-Resource-Officers.aspxThe Role of School Resource Officers<p>​Mo Canady, executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO), discusses the security implications of an SRO’s role in today’s educational environment.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. What are school resource officers (SROs) and what are some of their job functions?  </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>SROs are sworn law enforcement officers assigned by their employing law enforcement agency to work with schools. They go into the classroom with a diverse curriculum in legal education. They aid in teaching students about the legal system and helping to promote an awareness of rules, authority, and justice. Outside of the classroom, SROs are mentoring students and engaging with them in a variety of positive ways.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. What are some of the standards and best practices your organization teaches? </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. T</b>here are three important things that need to happen for an SRO program to be successful. Number one, the officers must be properly selected. Number two, they have to be properly trained. And thirdly, it has to be a collaborative effort between the law enforcement agency and the school district. This can’t just be a haphazard approach of, “We have a drug problem; let’s put some police officers in there and try to combat it.” It needs to be a community-based policing approach.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. Some SROs have come under fire for being too aggressive in the classroom. What’s your take?</i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>There have been a handful of incidents that have played out in the media. But, it is up to the investigating agency to determine right and wrong. I’ve been very happy with the fact that the majority of those officers involved in these incidents have not been trained by us.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. How does NASRO train officers to deal with potential threats? </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>In our training, we certainly talk about lockdown procedures and possible responses to active shooter situations, but we don’t get too detailed. It’s really up to each agency to make those kinds of decisions. In the case of an active shooter, I don’t believe most SROs are going to wait for additional backup to get there. Most of them are so bought into their schools and their relationships with their students, that if they hear gunfire, they’re going to go try to stop whatever is happening. </p><p class="p1"><i>Q. Do SROs consider themselves security officers? </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>We’re engaged in security and it’s a big part of what we do—but it’s just one piece of what we do. Sometimes when people think about physical security, the idea of relationship building doesn’t necessarily come in there, and yet it’s the lead thing for us. We know that through those relationships, if we’re building them the right way, we may get extremely valuable information from students, parents, faculty, and staff. It’s what leads to SROs in many cases being able to head off bad situations before they happen.</p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465